12 Months to Better

Diabetes Management

Gulf Coast Healthy Living Magazine Volume 4, Issue 1 - Healthy Lives

The key to successful diabetes management is to set goals. Refer to this month-to-month plan for the New Year, with each month providing a new “goal” to help you focus on better diabetes management to become a healthier you!

Make your goals attainable and applaud yourself after you reach them. Your confidence will rise and ultimately help you better manage diabetes.

Our registered nurses and nutritional experts would love to help you get started. Call Healthy Lives today at 850.469.6903. We can help you manage diabetes with education, meal planning and support.

Rachael Miller, RN, Health Coach and Diabetes Champion - Healthy Lives

Rachael Miller, RN, Health Coach and Diabetes Champion

Woman exercising.

January

START EXERCISING MOST DAYS A WEEK FOR 30 MINUTES AT A TIME.

Physical activity is one of the best ways to make cells more sensitive to insulin, therefore lowering blood sugar levels. Exercise can include fun physical activities such as dancing, gardening, household organizing and sports.

No fried foods.

February

AVOID BAKED GOODS, SNACKS, CREAMERS, MARGARINES, FRIED FOODS AND REFRIGERATED DOUGH.

Lowering your intake of trans-fats, helps decrease the risk of developing heart disease, which is especially important if you’re a diabetic.

Fruits.

March

CONSUME FIVE SERVINGS OF FRUITS AND VEGETABLES PER DAY

Fruits and vegetables contain fiber, an essential nutrient for managing blood sugar levels. Fiber also makes you feel fuller longer, causing you to eat less and better manage weight. Aim for eating more vegetables than fruit because they contain less natural sugar.

Sleep.

April

GET AT LEAST 7 TO 8 HOURS OF SLEEP AT NIGHT.

Inadequate sleep can increase the risk of developing or worsening Type 2 diabetes. Here’s why: 1) Tired people tend to eat more carbs and simple sugars causing a rise in blood sugar levels, and 2) lack of sleep can cause cells to be more resistant to insulin, which also causes a rise in blood sugar.

Punching glove.

May

TAKE A DIABETES MANAGEMENT CLASS.

Healthy Lives™ offers the Go Fight! Diabetes management program which includes an educational class geared toward the fundamentals of diabetes. Your doctor also can provide educational materials.

Cook book.

June

TRY A NEW RECIPE

Read books or get online to research low-carb meal options. Try this low-carb recipe to get you started.

Man drinking water.

July

STAY HYDRATED

Drink at least 64 ounces of water per day. Dehydration causes your bloodstream to become more concentrated which causes blood sugar levels to rise. You can tell if you are hydrated by the color of your urine which should be as clear as possible.

Image of a doctor.

August

SEE A DOCTOR

A visit to the primary care physician at least every three to six months and having routine lab work done can help prevent certain disease processes and appropriately treat diabetes. Read profiles of doctors.

Vision check.

September

GET AN EYE EXAM.

Diabetes increases your risk in developing eye related complications such as glaucoma, cataracts and retinopathy. Regular check-ups help avoid or maintain these issues.

No germs. Get a flu shot.

October

GET A FLU SHOT.

Flu or pneumonia can place a great deal of physical stress on your body and cause an increase in blood sugar levels. Recovery times are longer for diabetics and even worse, The Mayo Clinic reports that people with diabetes are three times more likely to die from the flu or pneumonia than those who have not been diagnosed with diabetes.

Decrease sweet foods.

November

DECREASE THE SWEETS.

Avoid grabbing cake or cookies when hungry and on the run. Reduce cravings by eating well-balanced meals. Choose fruit instead and increase your water intake. Drinking plenty of fluids will help you feel fuller longer and give you the strength to say no to sugar.

Image of a woman reading to reduce stress.

DECEMBER

REDUCE STRESS.

Not only does an increase in stress increase your blood pressure, it also causes your body to secrete certain hormones that will raise your blood sugar levels and make them difficult to control. Practice stress management with exercise, reading, a new hobby or taking small breaks to rest and relax.


One-Pan Crispy Chicken and Brussels Sprouts

Open this recipe in pdf

Ingredients

2 whole chicken legs (skin on and bone in)
1 stalk of Brussels sprouts, stemmed and chopped
1 generous tablespoon of coconut oil
Salt, pepper and granulated garlic
1 tablespoon olive oil, for sprouts
Juice of 1 lemon
1/4 cup chicken stock
Pecorino or Parmesan cheese to garnish
(optional)

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 425 degrees.
  2. Wash, prep, de-stem and halve the Brussels sprouts.
  3. Toss them in a bowl with olive oil and a pinch or two of salt, pepper and granulated garlic. Season to your taste.
  4. Wash the chicken legs and pat them dry.
  5. Liberally season both sides of the legs with salt, pepper and granulated garlic. Set aside.
  6. Heat up the coconut oil in a cast iron skillet until hot. To test, flick a drop of water into the oil. It should hiss and sizzle.
  7. Once the oil is heated up, add the chicken legs to the pan face down.
  8. Allow them to sit there and get crispy. This will take several minutes – approximately 6 to 8 minutes.
  9. Once the first side is crispy, flip the chicken legs over and crisp up the other side.
  10. When both sides of the chicken are crispy, add in the Brussels sprouts along with the chicken broth and lemon juice. Stir.
  11. Place the pan in the oven and bake for 30 minutes or until the chicken is cooked through, and the juices run clear.
  12. Garnish with some freshly grated Pecornio or Parmesan cheese and serve.
Serving: 1 cup Brussel sprouts and 3 - 4 ounces chicken 6 - 10 carbohydrates per serving